Meet the PYC Staff

Parents and Youth for Change is able to strengthen the voices of Burlington and Winooski community members with the help of these dedicated staff members.

Infinite Culcleasure

Infinite Culcleasure,  PYC Staff

Infinite Culcleasure began working as a community organizer with PYC in 2013, and recently added the role of project manager to his organizing duties in 2016.Inf’s favorite part of working with PYC is the house meetings and dinner with families in Winooski.

Contact Infinite at infinite@parentsforchangevt.org

Meg Cline

Meg Cline (seen with daughter Pax), PYC Staff

School didn’t work well for Meg. She didn’t have anyone in my middle school that knew her well or was invested in her. Meg was expelled in the eighth grade under a zero tolerance policy, never attended high school, and self-educated from then on. Meg previously worked a wide variety of jobs, in many fields, all of them either low paying or not meaningful. She dealt with many of the stressors and barriers that exist when it’s difficult to make ends meet and live on the difficult side of many statistics.

Meg is a mother to four shiny unique people. She wants them to have an engaging education in their public schools that nurtures their curiosity, values their voice, and leads to options and choices that are exciting to them after graduation. Meg wants that for every child and believes in the power of students and families organizing together to get everyone there.

Contact Meg at meg@parentsforchangevt.org

Read these Seven Days articles on Toni Foote and Aden Haji to learn more about PYC members!

 Check out the PYC accomplishments here!

Important Facts
School meals

In the 2013-2014 school year, 40.7% of students received meals categorized as free or reduced-price. Click on the graph for additional [more]

Poverty undermines children’s healthy development and has lasting effects on children’s physical and social-emotional health. Children growing up [more]

Early Prenatal Care

Between 2000 and 2010, the rate of pregnant women in Vermont receiving early prenatal care ranged between 80 and 85 percent. This was short [more]

Population

While the total population of Vermont has grown to an estimated 626,630, our child population has fallen since the 2000 Census count [more]

70% of Vermont’s housing stock was built prior to the 1978 ban on lead paint.  Lead paint and dust from lead [more]

Teen Births

Teen mothers often have fewer resources than older parents to provide for a healthy baby and for themselves.  Babies born [more]

7.5% of Vermont’s children received Reach Up (TANF) benefits in 2011; a 27% increase from 2007. [more]

98% of Vermont’s children have health insurance. [more]

Babies with low birthweight – under 5.5 pounds – are at risk for respiratory conditions, cognitive and developmental delays, and other long-term health [more]