Other State Children Ombudsman Offices

34 states currently have a children’s ombudsman in some form.

  • Independent and autonomous agency with oversight specific to child welfare:

Colorado

Connecticut

Georgia

Indiana

Maine

Massachussetts

Michigan

Missouri

Rhode Island

Tennessee

Washington

  • Operates within, but autonomous of,  the state agency providing child welfare services:

California

Texas

Utah

  • Provides oversight to all governmental agencies within the state including child welfare services:

Alaska

Arizona

Hawaii

Iowa

Nebraska

  • Non-Independent Children’s Ombudsman office, established within the child welfare agency:

Arkansas

Kentucky

Illinois

Oklahoma

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New York

Oregon

  • Other statutory Ombudsman-like programs

Delaware

Maryland

Minnesota

Nevada

  • Non-statutory county-based or program-based offices:

Montana

Ohio

South Carolina

Virginia

Find out more about the different types of Children’s Ombudsman Offices/Office of Child Advocate

Important Facts
School meals

In the 2013-2014 school year, 40.7% of students received meals categorized as free or reduced-price. Click on the graph for additional [more]

Poverty undermines children’s healthy development and has lasting effects on children’s physical and social-emotional health. Children growing up [more]

Early Prenatal Care

Between 2000 and 2010, the rate of pregnant women in Vermont receiving early prenatal care ranged between 80 and 85 percent. This was short [more]

Population

While the total population of Vermont has grown to an estimated 626,630, our child population has fallen since the 2000 Census count [more]

70% of Vermont’s housing stock was built prior to the 1978 ban on lead paint.  Lead paint and dust from lead [more]

Teen Births

Teen mothers often have fewer resources than older parents to provide for a healthy baby and for themselves.  Babies born [more]

7.5% of Vermont’s children received Reach Up (TANF) benefits in 2011; a 27% increase from 2007. [more]

98% of Vermont’s children have health insurance. [more]

Babies with low birthweight – under 5.5 pounds – are at risk for respiratory conditions, cognitive and developmental delays, and other long-term health [more]