Partners

Three-kids-hand-in-hand

Partnerships are key!

Councils

Medicaid  Advisory Board: comprised of providers, consumers, and advocates, and advises the Agency of Human Services and related Legislative Committees on Vermont’s public health care programs.
Vermont Center for Afterschool Excellence: a public-private statewide partnership initiative dedicated to supporting and sustaining innovative learning opportunities that extend beyond the school day for all Vermont’s children and youth.
Vermont Child Poverty Council: Established by the Vermont legislature in 2007, the Vermont Child
Poverty Council  is charged with developing a ten-year plan to cut the number of children living in poverty by at least 50 percent.
Vermont Pre-K – 16 Council: made up of educational, business, and legislative representatives, that will formulate a plan to ensure that our high school graduates are college- and career- ready and to raise the level of post-secondary education attainment for all Vermont citizens.

Coalitions

Vermont Early Childhood Alliance: a statewide early childhood coalition of individuals, organizations and businesses, whom are united around the mission of ensuring that every Vermont child has a solid foundation for future learning and growth. Formerly known as Kids Are Priority One Coalition.

New England Consortium (NEC):  a six-state collaborative of child research and policy organizations, who have developed a common set of priorities to reduce child and family poverty in our individual states and region, and act as a catalyst for national change at this time of increasing poverty.

Vermont Oral Health Care for All Coalition:  a statewide effort of organizations representing the diverse needs of citizens throughout the state, working to bring great access for affordable oral health care.

Vermont Paid Sick Days Coalition: a collection of businesses and organizations working to ensure that all working Vermonters are guaranteed paid sick days.

National and State Partners

KIDS COUNT/The Annie E. Casey Foundation: The Annie E. Casey Foundation is a private charitable organization, dedicated to helping build better futures for disadvantaged children in the United States. KIDS COUNT is a national and state-by-state project of the Annie E. Casey Foundation to track the status of children in the United States.
Nellie Mae Education Foundation: New England’s largest public charity is dedicated solely to preparing all the region’s learners for success.
Public Assets Institute: An organization that supports democracy by helping Vermonters understand and keep informed about what their government is doing, especially how it is raising and spending money and using other public assets.
Winooski-Burlington High School Partnership for Change: Voices for Vermont’s Children is on the ground in Winooski and Burlington. Our local community organizers support parents as leaders in changing their high schools to better prepare all students for the future – jobs, college and life.

Important Facts
School meals

In the 2013-2014 school year, 40.7% of students received meals categorized as free or reduced-price. Click on the graph for additional [more]

Poverty

Poverty undermines children’s healthy development and has lasting effects on children’s physical and social-emotional health. Children growing up [more]

Early Prenatal Care

Between 2000 and 2010, the rate of pregnant women in Vermont receiving early prenatal care ranged between 80 and 85 percent. This was short [more]

Population

While the total population of Vermont has grown to an estimated 626,630, our child population has fallen since the 2000 Census count [more]

70% of Vermont’s housing stock was built prior to the 1978 ban on lead paint.  Lead paint and dust from lead [more]

Teen Births

Teen mothers often have fewer resources than older parents to provide for a healthy baby and for themselves.  Babies born [more]

7.5% of Vermont’s children received Reach Up (TANF) benefits in 2011; a 27% increase from 2007. [more]

98% of Vermont’s children have health insurance. [more]

Babies with low birthweight – under 5.5 pounds – are at risk for respiratory conditions, cognitive and developmental delays, and other long-term health [more]